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29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from I break the law once every week to feel your touch with 76,142 notes

themaefive:

axonsandsynapses:

yuletidekarkat:

dannygayhealani:

creatingaquietmind:

the speech impediment of the 21st century (by Marc Johns)

I’ll fuck you up buddy this is not a speech impediment it’s linguistic evolution!! the existence of the phrase “Aisha was like” allows the speaker to convey whatever Aisha said without making the listener assume they’re quoting Aisha directly while still maintaining the FEELING of what Aisha said.
ie, Aisha said she didn’t want to go out with me VERSUS Aisha was like, “I’d rather kiss a Wookie”.
the addition of “XYZ was like” lets the speaker be more expressive and efficient and it is a totally valid method of communicating information!!

With the way language has evolved, this is one of the few ways I can even think of to express in casual conversation what someone said. 
"So I said to Aisha," is certainly used, but if you remove the "so," which implies casual tone ("and" can be used in the same way), you get
"I said to Aisha," which is really formal in most English dialects/variations. I don’t know about all, but in New England dialects, you sound like you’re reading aloud from a novel.
"I told Aisha," is really only used when you continue to describe, not tell, what you told her. Ex: "I told Aisha that James was too punk for her" works while, "I told Aisha, ‘James is too punk for you’" crosses the line back into formalness of the "I said."
Things like “I asked” or “I answered [with]” are similar levels of casual and efficient to the “So, I said [or say, as many conversations about the past take place in present tense anyway, as if the speaker is giving a play-by-play in the moment]” but are specific to only certain situations. 
"I was like, 'Marc Johns, what is your obsession with restoring archaic speech patterns and interfering with the natural progression of English from complex to efficient?'" envelopes all of these easily and is accessible and crisp, and allows for more variations on inflection than the others.
Of course, James is probably like, “I already fucking said that.” But eh, I tried adding on.

#linguistics #a.k.a. how I learned to stop worrying and love the evolution of the English language without being a discriminatory elitist jerk (via crystalandrock)

This a million times

themaefive:

axonsandsynapses:

yuletidekarkat:

dannygayhealani:

creatingaquietmind:

the speech impediment of the 21st century (by Marc Johns)

I’ll fuck you up buddy this is not a speech impediment it’s linguistic evolution!! the existence of the phrase “Aisha was like” allows the speaker to convey whatever Aisha said without making the listener assume they’re quoting Aisha directly while still maintaining the FEELING of what Aisha said.

ie, Aisha said she didn’t want to go out with me VERSUS Aisha was like, “I’d rather kiss a Wookie”.

the addition of “XYZ was like” lets the speaker be more expressive and efficient and it is a totally valid method of communicating information!!

With the way language has evolved, this is one of the few ways I can even think of to express in casual conversation what someone said. 

"So I said to Aisha," is certainly used, but if you remove the "so," which implies casual tone ("and" can be used in the same way), you get

"I said to Aisha," which is really formal in most English dialects/variations. I don’t know about all, but in New England dialects, you sound like you’re reading aloud from a novel.

"I told Aisha," is really only used when you continue to describe, not tell, what you told her. Ex: "I told Aisha that James was too punk for her" works while, "I told Aisha, ‘James is too punk for you’" crosses the line back into formalness of the "I said."

Things like “I asked” or “I answered [with]” are similar levels of casual and efficient to the “So, I said [or say, as many conversations about the past take place in present tense anyway, as if the speaker is giving a play-by-play in the moment]” but are specific to only certain situations. 

"I was like, 'Marc Johns, what is your obsession with restoring archaic speech patterns and interfering with the natural progression of English from complex to efficient?'" envelopes all of these easily and is accessible and crisp, and allows for more variations on inflection than the others.

Of course, James is probably like, “I already fucking said that.” But eh, I tried adding on.

  (via crystalandrock)

This a million times

Source: creatingaquietmind

29th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from The tumblr. with 247,737 notes

ohheyitsbrandon:

super-who-locked-in:

elenilote:

kateordie:

I hope the makers of this are ready to be millionaires

WHERE CAN I GET THIS

drink until the homicidal thoughts pass

This is brilliant. I must buy these for the apartment NOW.

Source: kashimiru

29th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from I break the law once every week to feel your touch with 316,009 notes

jem-love13:

Did you say clouds and sunsets?

Source: jem-love13

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Squishy Sheep with 2 notes

squishysheep:

asdfghjkl;

squishysheep:

asdfghjkl;

Tagged: one of the best moments of dual destinies

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Tick...Tock... Just A Little Pocket Watch with 12 notes

txmepassxs:

Gotta Love Ace Attorney

txmepassxs:

Gotta Love Ace Attorney

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from The tumblr. with 157,212 notes

sunshinychick:

futurescope:

Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

[read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]

sunshinychick:

futurescope:

Solar energy that doesn’t block the view

A team of researchers at Michigan State University has developed a new type of solar concentrator that when placed over a window creates solar energy while allowing people to actually see through the window. It is called a transparent luminescent solar concentrator and can be used on buildings, cell phones and any other device that has a clear surface. And, according to Richard Lunt of MSU’s College of Engineering, the key word is “transparent.”

[read more at MSU] [paper] [picture credit: Yimu Zhao]

image

Source: futurescope

29th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from I break the law once every week to feel your touch with 34,863 notes

bctheinternet:

Louis C.K. on slavery

Source: bctheinternet

29th August 2014

Video reblogged from Chez Tumblr with 72,513 notes

thatninjawordz:

uglyfoxybaby:

jonsnowflakes:

Collegehumors’ new video is on point as always

Tagged: omg

Source: jonsnowflakes

29th August 2014

Chat reblogged from The tumblr. with 38,953 notes

  • Me: ah, yes. Home alone. I can do whatever I want!
  • Me: *turns TV up a couple notches*
  • Me: *watches YouTube videos without headphones*
  • Me: getting crazy up in here

Source: gilalyallen

29th August 2014

Photo reblogged from class in session! with 3,546 notes

shiny-cradily:

Surfing Pikachu by request (x,x)

shiny-cradily:

Surfing Pikachu by request (x,x)

Source: shiny-cradily